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to get anything going and that's the way to deal with the deficits, of course. and there were some measures there. no national insurance payments for employees for the first few thousand pounds reducing corporation tax earlier to 20%. infrastructure spending, could it be more? businesses would always want more. but there was acknowledgement he tried while keeping the next fiscally neutral. on the whole, businesses say, not bad, could have done more. i think that will be the summation for them. the key factor, of course, is if you're not going to do more to stimulate your own growth, what happens to the eurozone becomes even more important. and i did speak to the chancellor, george osborne, just a short while ago and i asked him how worried is he about what's going on in cypress? this is what he had to say. >> it is a worrying situation in cypress and i think there's been some sole rans in international markets and elsewhere that they've got to sort these problems out. but obviously, we now need a solution. if i would have concerns if these depositors, less than a hundred thousand e
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets here are a little lower, not all that much, though, given what we've had in headline risk this morning. dow jones industrial is down 38 points and s&p is off about 9. bob pisani is here to tell us what is going on. there's a lot of headline risk in the market today. >> and we're back moving on europe now. >> exactly. given 38 to the downside is not that bad. >> even europe is not reacting that much. let me show you the euro. everyone goes crazy talking about the euro. perhaps the finance minister may be resigning, we're trying to confirm that for sure. that's what we've been hearing. and on words that the governing b
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
know they have a barbershop there? you can go and beat hair cut there. but they are running deficits of $350,000 a year. time to privatize? >> kimberly: time to supercuts. >> dana: speaking of that, we did a google search. if you let the senators know it would not be the end of the world if you had to give up the senate barbershop. look on the map. there are seven places in walking distance from the capitol to get your hair cut. >> kimberly: now give them coupons to go over there. and give it to the barber and start it up. c'mon, i pay less to get my hair done. >> dana: time to privatize the senate barbershop? >> greg: i don't know. look at the success the barbershops have had. good job, guys. >> eric: you got your hair cut? >> greg: they fell asleep at the wheel. i use the great acres analogy. obama's democrats are like the sexy zaza that could expense every vehicle they have. eddie arnold is the guy that always has to play the bills. we have zsa zsa gabor in the white house. it's great because in a sense they're our mother so they tell us thousand use the microwave. might be at nig
it in for the dunk to cut the deficit to one. st. louis was just too much. cody ellis drains the three to give st. louis a six-point lead. they go on to win 62-56. so st. louis plan to watch the ncaa selection at the airport but they ran into traffic so they settled for watching it at a best buy in new jersey. look, it comes with comedy la-z-boys. don't expect to see defending champion kentucky, they were left out of the big dance. we start in the midwest where louisville claim the top 87 all seed in the tournament. should they win they'll face the winner of the colorado state versus missouri game. in the west, gonzaga got the number one seed but they've got a tough road. they would face the winner of the pitt versus wichita state game in the second round. on the other side of the bracket kansas took the top seed in the south but they have a date with either unc or villanova should they advance to the round of 32. in the east, indiana starts as the top seed. it's second seed miami that has a lot of people talking. they'll face pacific in the opening round. then vegas likes louisville to take the
that passed through the senate really echos what president obama would like to see in terms of deficit reduction but the problem, of course, is when you match up is the senate bill with the house bill. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously fr
we go deficit reduction. you saw minutes 6-3. there was expectation we had noises out from tucker that perhaps there might have been a bigger number voting for qe. what we will look at today is to see what osbourne does with the bank of england and there's a bunch of things he might do from amending the target, inflation target to changing the bank of england act saying we'll put in a jewel mandate. that may be more of a focus than anything he says about borrowing figures and growth numbers. >> absolutely. you can look at the sterling reaction here, ross. we're spiking above 151 now on the back of those minutes. melanie, over to you. i guess investors would have liked to see hints of a more accommodative bank of england here during the last meeting. might there not be more of a policy shift under way perhaps as ross said related to even changing the mandate? >> in terms of what we're expecting today, we do think that it might be the more interesting of the budget to watch. i wouldn't expect any big changes today. i think what he may do is announce a review of the policy fra framew
year believe they had a $37 million deficit in the city of 166 million. sitting there saying, you owe us $30 million per year. lighter nighter going back to pay. tried twice in the last year the charter renegotiate. the first time they tell them, and this is what is a believable. they did not qualify for hardship. i don't know what that means of the folks. what to they have to do, be under steep -- under siege by north korea? and then on top of that they give them the excuse that legally there's nothing we can do because our contract says are obligated to pay us so that we compare pensioners. gerri: thank you for coming on. appreciate your time. we will continue to paula. i hope you will come back. >> i would love to. thank you. gerri: are you underestimating your retirement needs to make the president of charles robb joins me next with a startling report. post with the big retirement planning mistakes that we're all making. stay with us. ♪ ♪ gerri: confident that your golden years? your survey finds that may not be the case. how to plan for your retirement coming up next. ♪ the
of cutting something else we have a trillion dollar deficit. neil: you know, every time the president or something else goes on a foreign trip, i immediately hang to my wallet. they open the wallet left and right to the foreign governments, i'm thinking, that is not good. >> last week, we signed a contract state department, giving usaid 25 million to crime frightennishtivefight inivetives in el salvador. foreign trade is a much better way to get there. but this shows that spending that steve is talking about happens every day, no one cares, very few people write about itic semp cranks like us, and maybe you should step back, take a breath and cut something. neil: the foreign aid budget, is you know, if you count it about 20 billion a year. that is a lot of money to be giving away from american taxpayers to give to foreign country, and show me any example where foreign aid has worked to make a country richer. i said, it gives money from poor people, and rich people, and gives to to rich people in poor countries that is what foreign aid is. neil: thank you very much. >> thank you. neil:
what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much
, the deficit, the long term budget plan and they haven't cleaned up their room. while the president is pushing ahead with his second term priorities today, he hosted a 28 brand new american citizens at the white house including 13 service members. >> after avoiding the problem for years, the time has come to fix it once and for all. the time has come for a comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. we are making progress but we've got to finish the job. we've just got at this point to work up the political courage to do what is required to be done. so i expect a bill to be put forward. i speck the debate to begin next month. i want to sign that bill into law as soon as possible. >> what if anything can get done while congress is away? politico's marty kay, can the president make the most of these two weeks? can he do things while congress is away? >> he can probably be very effective while congress is away of they're scattered around the country and the world. he can use this time to talk about immigration, a little about gun control if he wants to. what we heard at the end of last week befor
on the possible deficit reduction deal. hi, john. >> it's an interesting blend of confrontation and cooperation. call it a controlled battle because you've got the u.s. senate today taking up a bill to avert a government shutdown by sustaining government funding beyond march 27th. the house has already passed the bill. there are differences between the two chambers and the two parties on what they want to do to the effects of the the bill. it smoothed out some things. made it easier for the pentagon to adjust. the senate has other departments which it's trying to help. still some disagreements there. but they expect to be worked out by the end of the week. at the same time, there's a huge gap between the two long-term budget plans that the two parties are pushing. and john boehner over the weekend said, we're done with tax increases. he was repeating that position. the house white house responded, the senior adviser, saying no deal is possible as long as john boehner is in that place. so that's where we are, sue. you've got on the one hand the two parties working together. they are like my to a
. you think our deficit is bad, they don't print that much money in the fed. we don't have that much in the system. jon: jim gray, good to talk to you. thanks, jim. jenna: breaking news out of washington, d.c. the president is officially announcing his nomination for labor secretary. his name is thomas perez. he is standing next to the president. just a few things he should know about thomas perez. assistant attorney general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched
-term debt and recovered the budget deficit. detroit is the largest u.s. city ever put under state control. those are your headlines. i am lauren reed. back to connell. connell: a move lower in stocks. we have noticed some of the french banks. they are all down. dagen: a snowstorm that dumped as much as 2 feet in the northwest. connell: i would rather be over in cyprus. >> good morning. we are tracking it again. parts of illinois being hit with as much as 15 inches of snow. it is as far west as parts of indiana. the highest snowfall totals should be a foot of snow. we do have winter storm warnings in effect. it is because of the wind and snowfall amounts. we actually have been seeing some delays. they are about an hour or so. you could see four-6 inches of snow out here. the central appellations and most of these warnings should expire by tomorrow. that is what we think the storm system will pull out of the northeast leaving behind some quieter conditions. connell: that sounds, well, all right. dagen: tom kloza is coming up with a big addiction on gasoline prices. he says you will save mon
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
a surplus of politics and deficit of intelligence when it comes to this. germans and fins and a number of others feel they have to tell very uninformed electorate that they are being tough. we have to extract some blood. they don't understand that this is a two pointed sword. by trying to extract blood from greeks sand cypriots they are inflicting enormous pain. $500 billion worth of capitalization around the world wiped out. >> as moronic as this plan was, we've heard there are not a lot of options. >> there are options. >> first of all, they should be putting in place the equivalent of the fdic. when we close a failed bank in the united states, we go in on a friday with fdic and occ. it's all hush hush. you close the bank. you move the depositors money into a good bank and you don't lose faith in the banking system. >> don't they need 27 countries to put that in their charter? >> this is what europe was moving toward. this is what was recognized this past summer and this is why -- >> we knew it would take time. >> this throws that out the window and the thing is that they're not sayi
to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. but the europeans have made a categoric statements. cypress has to come up with 5.8 billion euros. it can't be throu
deficit. we're spending a trillion more than we take in every year. everything has to be on the table. one thing i would suggest is that there are tipping points to everything. in the middle class segment people between $100,000 to $250,000 in home purchase price, mortgage interest makes sense to the middle class borrowers. and the question is do they count that when they look to buy a home versus rent. people stopping buying altogether. if it has an impact, how does that impact construction? has to be on the table. it has to be something we take in context with the broader picture. >> help us get rid of freddie and fannie some day too. put something together for me, will you? >> keep in mind, while we sit around and vilify freddie and fannie. >> see you love them. that's a shock. >> i don't. i think we ought to go away from them. but we need liquidity to ensure there's capital. >> can't do it now. especially now. all right. great hair. good looking man. and you watch, unlike some other people that work here. anyway, thanks, dave. >> you may not watch for a few minutes when you walk to get
if rates were liar. they had the time because rates were so much lower and deficit was going up slower. in a real sense the fed buying the treasuries has made it less painful for the government. >> i'm not sure if the population that chairs the euro or those that chair somewhat with central planning with regard to the 27 countries, but my question to you is i'm not sure we're going to lose any of these countries, but on the other hand, keeping their funding and the central bankers and the banks and insolvency all in line is a full -time job. is anybody worried about how we're growing these economies? is that the rally big elephant in the room? >> the growth hasn't phone zone up. we talked about it many times. what is the eventual exit strategy? our fed can't decide when to stop buying treasuries much less strengthen the balance sheet. >> i talked to jim bianco about the taper. this is another arena where the fed is going to paint themselves into a corner, they're going to move them up and down with every data point? in the end, they just have to say enough is enough, don't they? >> goi
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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